Posts Tagged: wine

mud and wine

“It’s still raining.”

I’m walking up to the car rental place on Saturday morning to retrieve the car in which my girls and I will drive down to the much anticipated Shores of Erie wine festival in our home town when Debbie calls. “Bring rubber boots, raincoats, umbrellas, tarps, dinghies – whatever you got. And for heaven’s sake, don’t wear anything white. Or nice.”

I’d been getting updates on the back home weather all week; it started pouring about five days previous and hadn’t stopped; until that moment I’d nicely avoided thinking about the consequences. And call me a reckless avoider, but I don’t even consider taking that freshly ironed white shirt out of my suitcase.

The back home weather report is inconceivable. It’s the most perfect morning of the entire year, and I wish we could move the entire festival four hours up the highway. Luscious September days like this are precious: sunny with a soft breeze – the kind that caresses your skin with the gentlest of kisses. There isn’t an ounce of humidity and the sky is so clear it sparkles.

After collecting the girls we get on the highway, happy in spite of the mucky news. The event is about old friends, wine, food and live music. Last year we had such a good time, seeing so many of my home people dishing out so much love. Add to that memory the gorgeousness of that September and the beautiful setting alongside a familiar river – not going was not an option.

Drive2

The luscious weather remains perfect for pretty much the whole ride down the highway. When we’re down to a half hour away, we begin to see layers of cloud formations: some thick and cotton-like, seemingly miles deep, others wispy and flying fast underneath them. And then the occasional black one hanging like a lame threat over some farm field.

When we finally pull into the yard at Debbie and Len’s, it’s stopped raining and Deb’s looking disbelievingly at the breaks of blue in the sky. We did our best to bring it along, we say.

 

MUD

The rolling grounds of Fort Malden are a sloppy mess. We’re talking barnyard. It seems no less crowded than last year. Apparently wine lovers are a serious lot, and no one is going to let a little rain and mud diminish any of their fun. Kind of like making lemonade out of life’s lemons, what was once a promenade of cute dresses and sandals has morphed into a parade of audacious wellies.

Boots 2

Thousands of pairs of audacious wellies – beautiful thing number sixty-three.

One doesn’t venture away from one’s table much this year for fear of going topsy turvy in the muck. And yes, I wore that white shirt. At one point Kelsey has to ask a bloke to give her a pull because she gets stuck. She isn’t the only one suffering mucky dilemmas. We witness a number of fall-downs one amusing one by a guy who is gallantly carrying a girl on his back. It is amusing because Princess is NOT pleased and climbs BACK on his slimy back for the rest of the journey to the paved walk about five feet away.

Next day, Sunday, the sun joins the party and by after lunch when we go back to the site, the conditions have improved considerably, and continue to do so until the event closes. Sarah Harmer, who we’d stayed the extra day to hear play charms everybody. With the crowds considerably thinned and the sun shining, it is a most pleasant day.

image from www.flickr.com

They say that for a time Fort Malden served as a lunatic asylum. I’m amused by the thought of what those who walked the Fort Malden grounds a couple hundred years ago might be thinking from the vantage point of a netherworld, of these hoards of people in crazy-coloured rubber footwear happily wallowing around in acres of mud and seeming to celebrate that with endless toasting and good cheer.

image from www.flickr.com

If I were one of those netherworld beings, I might see that party down there, mud and all as most definitely beautiful thing number sixty-four.

everything’s strange and everything’s the same

My girls and I leave the city Saturday morning and head southwest to my hometown for an oft-lauded wine festival and visiting with old friends.  We listen to classic rocks songs on the radio which instigate one memory after another - a nice accompaniment to the flat, boring stretch of highway.  As we get close to Essex County, the sky gets more and more overcast and we curse the imminent rain for intruding on the much anticipated party. 

Navigating the once-daily haunts due south of HWY 401 is like I always say: everything’s strange and everything’s the same.  I drop the girls off at their dad’s and go to Debbie’s where we catch up over a Guinness.  I hope you have a friend like her

The rain is coming down hard and steady and we carry on cursing it over a drive to the grocery store to pick up what will become the beautiful spread of a breakfast the next morning. Once we’ve all gathered back at the house we pack up golf umbrellas and plastic sheeting to cover wet picnic table seats, and the rain lets up just then.  Even the weather gods shouldn’t mess with serious wine drinkers intent on a good time and happy homecoming.

The grounds are a bit mucky but certainly not “Woodstock” as some grim souls had predicted.  As soon as we walk into the place and before I can get some wine into my glass we start running into old friends.  I didn’t send out a “facebook blast” saying I was going down, thinking that with the short turnover in time I’d be content to bump into people as the fates would have us do. 

There are lots of long hugs.  I don’t know if I can describe my gratification in the love I got from my old friends – to still "belong" to them.  I make my home in Toronto now, but despite a number of moves around different neighbourhoods I still don’t feel as if I “belong” anywhere.  Maybe that’s related to my single, empty-nester state.  But whatever it is, these wonderful old pals can’t possibly know how easily they filled what has been a rather empty vessel for quite some time.

Next morning at Debbie and Len’s we all sleep late, maybe a little groggy from all those bottles of that excellent D’Angelo Foch.  After the big breakfast, Deb and I sit out in the backyard with spiked orange juice and admire the day – particularly the clouds.

MaillouxFarm 
Not willing to waste the weather gods’ change of heart, we go back to the festival site and see some more people, and try some foods.  It's such a beautiful spot beside the river, and it is great to look around the town and all its changes. 

NavyYard1 
CloudsOverRiver1
The Detroit River – such a feature of that town, fundamental to the peoples' sensibility.  My father sailed tugs on those waters for many years.

As I told a couple of my colleagues about the weekend Monday morning, one said she thought I looked particularly happy.  She’s right.  This sort of weekend is one of those reminders about what exactly it is that sustains us.  I don’t care what they say.  You can go home again, and they will all love you as much as they did the day you left.

water and wine

Yesterday I’m trying out a little Italian place near my home I’ve not eaten at before.  Contrary to my current diet efforts (particularly after that crazy sandwich in Pittsburgh), I order a nice little flatbread pizza with prosciutto and tomato and a glass of chardonnay. 

Two families come in with very tiny baby girls in slings and a little boy.  I think of my two brand new grand-nieces and, to borrow a phrase from my Aunt Sharon, my eyes leaked a little. 

They order glasses of water as their beverages, and enter into a discussion about the types of bottled water they drink, debating which types are healthier; which have too much calcium and those that have too much fluoride, and the others that have not been filtered enough, and then the ones that are filtered too much.  The debate carries on about ten minutes and ends with one of the young husbands sounding so pompous in his delivery and pedantic in reasoning, especially when he snaps at his wife and I think she must be silently cursing him and the source of his vast knowledge on the topic. 

I’m itching to jump in and give him my two-cents about the scary implications of us letting drinking water become a consumer item and the vast amounts of completely unnecessary waste bottled water causes because people let themselves get scared into believing that it is “safer” and “healthier” than tap water.  In some countries it is.  In Canada where there is treated water, it’s not.  (Unless you live on a First Nations reserve – but that’s a whole other rant kettle of fish.)

But my opinions on bottled water are neither here nor there in this story.  The server arrives to take the orders and three out of the four adults, plus the little boy, gets Fettuccini Alfredo. 

I guess a plateful of over-the-top calories, saturated fat, processed white flour and probably too much sodium is off the radar for these health-conscious folks. 

I take sip of my own favourite bottled beverage and think maybe my dinner choice wasn’t all that bad.

as good as it gets

My weekend was about perfect.  It was a weekend of daughters and cousins and old friends and talking and catching up and shopping and sharing meals and gifts and sunshine and some long overdue and badly needed sister time. 

It's summertime and life is good.

 Wine Glass

The kind of weekend that merits a platinum star!

 Wine glass reflecting star