Posts Tagged: seeing

young man seeing

This morning I’m watching a young guy sketch people on the subway.  I’m an observer of an observer.  I’m captivated by his surreptitious search for detail and the subsequent concentration in getting what he sees onto the page of his sketchbook.

I get to imagining what the young man’s eyes are seeing in the short amount of time he has to create the images.  Line?  Space?  Plane?  Perspective?   Or is he, like I so often am, imagining what lies beneath the surface – what is it about that changing furrow in a brow, that curl of a lip, what thoughts are washing over that face looking at itself in a window’s reflection? 

The artist is young enough that I can guess he is still at the point of the former, working to strengthen his skill before attempting to convey the layers of his subjects’ humanity into his drawings.  But then I also expect that the more an artist becomes accustomed to seeing, the more evident those layers become.  So what is going on under those lines and planes must be evident at some level of his consciousness.

As I watch him, aspects of tunnel walls and station platforms move in shifting formations in the window behind him, and people move in and out of his space with that air of muted resignation that morning commuters always have.  What I see is a young man in a bubble; a bubble in the middle of a busy transit system, in the middle of rush hour, in the middle of a big city, amongst thousands of people, most of whom are working very hard with various means to ignore and avoid the unpleasantness of experiencing each other.  And I feel grateful to have encountered this one person who is striving to do the opposite – to see them.

And for that, the young man seeing is beautiful thing number 27 of 101.

 

Are you finding it?

selma’s story – twenty-sixth thing

My bloggy pal Selma wrote a story about an artist and a poet called Donald yesterday.  If you've read me for any length of time, you'd know that it's my kind of story. 

It's a story about beauty, about discovering how to see it and being thankful for the gifts we are given - those kinds of gifts that form who one becomes over the course of a personal evolution.

Go read Selma's story here.  It's called Artist in the Park.  And it's the twenty-sixth beautiful thing in my thirty days of finding them.