Posts Tagged: city living

good morning

Meet Glenn Gould. He gives me a nod every morning when I walk by the CBC Broadcast Centre on my way to work.

image from www.flickr.com
In afternoons when I'm walking home, I find him enduring tourists.  He poses with them but really, he'd rather not; Glenn was never much inclined to hang out amongst the masses.

Some days I wish I could just sit next to him there, quietly, and watch the world go by and not have to talk to anybody.

 

to see in twilight

The other day a friend, who’s lived in Toronto most of his life, commented that I have a pretty good understanding of the city considering I moved here only a few years ago. Actually it was five years ago, and I think five years is plenty of time to get to know a city. But then I suppose in a large one like this, with its many distinct neighbourhoods, one might establish the habit of frequenting nearby and familiar spaces. I’m sure my familiarity with the city has much to do with my having lived in four of those neighbourhoods, and working in a place substantially north to all of them. I’ve got around, and mostly without a car. The best thing about not owning a car isn’t actually the wagonload of money I save. It’s the ability to get up close and personal with a place, to really see it.

Last night I rode the streetcar home at dusk. To me, it’s the most perfect time of day; when the night begins to slide in and envelope you and your world. The shades of blue and purple are divine. Even the names for this time of day are beautiful – dusk, nightfall, eventide, and the loveliest of all: twilight. And then as darkness settles, space becomes more immediate; time slows; sounds muffle; people change demeanour. As the light dwindles, the city’s heartbeat slows. I sat on a streetcar last night and watched the light change and the city moving within it.

Streetcar 4
On a Sunday evening when the city is winding down a weekend, it can be a most pleasant time to be gliding through the streets on a rail. I especially love the 505 and 504 King Street cars that take me from my cousin’s home in Riverdale over to Spadina, where I get off and walk slowly down the last ten minutes or so to where I live. I might get home faster if I took the subway, but I couldn’t imagine how a few minutes are worth more than the time spent looking at the city. In the summer I sit by an open window and stick my face in it and enjoy the stroke of night in my hair.

Streetcar 2
Not all, but most times, I feel lucky that I don’t have to have a car. When walking or riding, I feel together with the city – like a functioning aspect of a sprawling organism. What I lost in convenience when I ditched the car I’ve gained in stimulus, space and sight. When one drives through the city, one generally sticks to available highways and arterial streets – those which get you where you’re going the fastest. When you’re walking you can cut through side streets and see the nooks and crannies without much consequence to your time. In fact, if you’ve walked your daily travels for any length of time, your sense of time changes. It isn’t quite so urgent to get home because focusing your attention on the features and nuances that happen across your path; or you get lost in the meditative aspect of steady walking, feet pacing earth. You’re more able to be present in the NOW.

Streetcar1
A person like me places a lot of value in her ability to pay attention to the world. Paying attention inspires her; makes her happier and more alive. Paying attention to her immediate world gets her out of her head. She is connected with the streets and patterns of movement in and around them.

Sometimes the city – in spite of its noise, in spite of the cacophony and vast numbers of people – brings her not a little joy. Particularly at twilight.

 

Twilight, dusk, eventide, nightfall, sundown – whatever you want to call it, it's beautiful. And beautiful thing number fifty-seven.

beautiful stuff midweek in a february

Thirteen: Today’s sunshine.  It’s above O°C, for starters, and that is always a bloody beautiful day this time of year.  But the sun – whooo boy do we need it.  I take vitamin D supplements but there’s an extra dose of something in that sunshine – like some secret vitamin that worms its way through your pores and bones and finds its way to your soul. 

But it’s more than that today – the sun is different today.  It's closer, more present.  I could feel it enveloping me down there on the ground, as opposed to just shining down and filtering its way through the blanket of winter.  It’s as if spring is hovering at the door deciding whether to come in.  I say come on in Spring – you’re never more beautiful than you are when you’re hovering at the door.

Fourteen: This post by Steve.  My friend – women everywhere are going to be jealous of your beached goddess.  Finding wonder in long-established love, what could be more beautiful?

Fifteen: This cookbook, which I bought on the weekend.  I have to make myself not buy cookbooks; I could sit and look at them forever.  But I allowed myself this one because I buy the magazine often and I justified the cookbook thinking that instead of buying the magazine every month, I would buy this at the cost of less than two issues.  (Who am I kidding?  It’s a beautiful magazine.)

Clean eating 
These days I'm particularly enamoured with cookbooks featuring natural, unprocessed food.  Natural food is of the most beautiful gifts this planet shares with us, and meals that are simply and lovingly prepared from it is more beauty for the soul.  This winter I’m in love with food more than I’ve ever been – maybe it was my way of enduring embracing the winter months.  When my television is on, it’s on Food Network most of the time – when I'm not cooking and eating, I'm watching somebody else cooking and eating. 

Recently I had to put a moratorium on kitchen activities because I had too many things saved in the freezer for my lunches and dinners.  I’ve used it up and am rocking the kitchen again.  Last night I made Turkey Chili Taco Soup and I’m counting down the minutes until lunchtime so I can eat it.  

Sixteen: How I feel when I do yoga.  My body is not a lot of things.  But it continues to be flexible and bendy and for that I feel fortunate, because the little bit of heaven I feel at the end of a yoga session is something you just can’t bottle.  I’m so ready for serious some outside action again, but in the meantime, daily yoga makes me happy – and beautiful.

How do you define what's beautiful?