blue clouds

I love the mystery of the sudden flashback. You know, that long-forgotten moment that pops into consciousness, seemingly unprovoked. I often I wish I could go back over my thought process in a backward time-lapse so that I can figure out what exactly it was that brought the memory about. Most times it remains a mystery, though I’m certain there’s some reason my brain is illuminating that random moment at that particular time.

This whole thing is the most captivating aspect of memoir writing to me – digging up these moments that are tucked into corners of the brain and working out why they stayed in there, and connecting them all together to determine how they form something of a road map in the development who the person is today.

I digress. The point is it happened the other night. We’re watching TV and out of nowhere I’m recalling sitting in Mrs. Salisbury’s grade one classroom and we’re all drawing landscapes with crayons. And we’re colouring our clouds blue. It must have been a six-year-old “thing.” Maybe we were just too lazy to colour in the expanse of the sky so we were indicating the blueness of it by colouring the smaller bits because it was faster.

I remember, too, Mrs. Salisbury, questioning this convention. “Look out the window! Clouds aren’t blue!”

“She’s right” thought the little kid who simply hated to get things wrong in front of people. And forevermore the little kid coloured the sky blue around the white, sometimes grey clouds.

So I get wondering, was I remembering an early lesson in critical thinking? Or was it a lesson in social conformity? Because it’s fun to imagine what that teacher would have said if we were, say, painting our clouds in rainbows or purple plaids or orange polka dots or fiery flames. Would she admire our creative expression? Or would she say “clouds are not plaid!”

It seems the universe wanted me to give more thought to the life lesson question, because the very next morning I open up the “365 Days of Flow” inspirational app on my iPad to find this little image:

Untitled

Mrs. Salisbury was a teacher; without a doubt she was trying to get us to think critically and draw what we see. And I’d hope that she’d be glad to know I developed some really good critical skills. But what the grown up me also knows is that artists are both critical thinkers AND innovators who express things in new and individual ways.

That girl who still hates to get things wrong  needs to be reminded, often it seems, that creative expression is never “wrong.” It is fun, experimental, relaxing, illuminating, challenging, rewarding and meditative. And none of those things is ever wrong.

And I can say with absolute certainty that when my grandchildren show me their drawings, I’m gonna say, “look at those fabulous blue clouds!” And we’ll find other things at which to hurl our critical skills. Like Disney movies.

2 Comments

  1. Reply
    Mike May 19, 2015

    Jen, your grandchild will bring you unbelievable joy, congrats to you, Carly and family… I just let Genevieve lead the way and I follow… “Papa do this”… be it jumping around or spinning, playing piano with our feet or putting our faces against the front window and barking like dogs… Roscoe taught us that… nice to see you blogging again! Love to you and yours, Mike

    • Reply
      Jennifer May 19, 2015

      Mike that Genevieve is the sweetest thing! I just LOVE to see pictures of her on Facebook and Instagram. Carry on Papa and enjoy rediscovering the world with her. Great to hear from you! Love to you and yours back. Oh – and we CAN’T WAIT until Carly and Jamie’s comes along!

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